About Apprehended Violence Orders (AVOs) and people with intellectual disability

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Apprehended Violence Orders

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What is an AVO?

An Apprehended Violence Order (AVO) is a court order made to protect a person from violence, harassment, being threatened, stalked or indimidated.

There are two types of AVOs- Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVO) and Apprehended Personal Violence Orders (APVO.)

Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVO)

An ADVO order is made when people involved are related, are currently or were in the past, in an intimate relationship, or are living together. This is considered to be a "Domestic Relationship", and is defined under section 5 of the Crimes (Domestic and Personal Violence) Act 2007.

Please refer to the Legal Aid website's policy section on ADVO to find out if Legal Aid is available.

Apprehended Personal Violence Orders (APVO)

An APVO is made when the people involved are not related and were not and are not in a domestic relationship.

Please refer to the Legal Aid website's policy section on APVO to find out if Legal Aid is available.

Where to get help with AVO matters?

IDRS can provide legal advice and help to organise support at court for people with intellectual disability involved in AVO proceedings.

For more information- 02 9318 0144

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